Emoji Domain- ???.ws

This weekend, I finally decided to jump on the bandwagon (if you can even call it that) and snag an emoji domain. Lol.

How to Register an Emoji Domain

First things first, you need to choose what you want. Chances are you’ll need to have at least two emojis in your new URL since it’s likely that single emoji domains are already registered. To search emojis on your computer, you can go to Edit > Emojis & Symbols on your Desktop,

but I much prefer going to emojipedia.org and searching emojis there. Once you’ve found your set of emojis, copy & paste them into a Punycode translator with a .ws extension: https://www.charset.org/punycode.

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Opening Pandora’s Box at Coventry

Yesterday I spoke with a faculty cohort at Coventry University about creating their own portfolios. This group was part of the Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice in Higher Education (or PgCert) course led by Martin Jenkins. PgCert provides professional development for faculty and staff, and this cohort will be building out a portfolio as part of the process. This is exciting because it builds on what Chris Long calls “online scholarly presence,” which provided a great frame for my discussion. Not sure it was recorded, but I’ve included the slides below that link to the various resources I discussed during the short presentation if you’re interested.

This was also exciting because it’s the precursor to a longer trip I’ll be taking to Coventry next week to talk to a number of staff, faculty, and students about opening up the Pandora’s Box that is Domain of One’s Own on their campus. I’m not saying they’re going to be running the very first Domains project in the UK at Coventry University through the Disruptive Media Learning Lab….at least I’m not saying that just yet. Who knows, there may even be a 90s computer lab/living room in our future!

Opening Pandora’s Box at Coventry

Kiss Me Deadly's Pandora's Box

Yesterday I spoke with a faculty cohort at Coventry University about creating their own portfolios. This group was part of the Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice in Higher Education (or PgCert) course led by Martin Jenkins. PgCert provides professional development for faculty and staff, and this cohort will be building out a portfolio as part of the process. This is exciting because it builds on what Chris Long calls “online scholarly presence,” which provided a great frame for my discussion. Not sure it was recorded, but I’ve included the slides below that link to the various resources I discussed during the short presentation if you’re interested.

This was also exciting because it’s the precursor to a longer trip I’ll be taking to Coventry next week to talk to a number of staff, faculty, and students about opening up the Pandora’s Box that is Domain of One’s Own on their campus. I’m not saying they’re going to be running the very first Domains project in the UK at Coventry University through the Disruptive Media Learning Lab….at least I’m not saying that just yet ? Who knows, there may even be a 90s computer lab/living room in our future!

Capture, Annotate and Share Screenshots

Newest app worth looking into: Annotate

I’ve been using this app for a couple of months, per Tim‘s discovery, and it rocks. As both the title of this post and the tagline of the app suggest, Annotate really does change the name of the game in the world of screenshotting.

Capture, Annotate and Share Screenshots

^Annotate allows you box out the part of a screenshot that you’re wanting to focus on. This is most useful in showing a customer where to click inside of their account. I love that it still keeps the rest of the screenshot visible so the viewer can keep their whereabouts, but still hones in on the important part of the screenshot.

Capture, Annotate and Share Screenshots

^Another favorite Annotate feature is the blurring out tool. I’m sure it’s assumed, but this is helpful for writing tutorials or support tickets where you need to screenshot a window that has holds private information. This screenshot also exemplifies the arrow and text features.

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