Whoowns or Whoowens?

One of the cPanel scripts I’ve found really useful as of late is the whoowns script that let’s you know which account owns a specific domain. Let me provide a quick scenario.  You have an issue with a domain and you can’t figure out which account in lives in, which could mean it’s an addon domain that wasn’t registered through us, etc. Tracking it down can be a pain. You can figure out what server it is on by using a command like nslookup (nameserver lookeup) that will tell you the hostname and identify the server:

nslookup themissingdomain.tld

The above command will return something like beathap.reclaimhosting.com.  Which means the account is on the Beathap server, but given it is not the primary domain of an account it is not going to appear in the list of all cPanel account. And this is where I would get stuck.

But using whoowns will tell you the account owner, just log in via terminal and use the following command:

/scripts/whoowns themissingdomain.tld
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That will tell you the account that domain lives in which means problem solved. A simple, useful script.

So, when extolling its virtues in Slack I wrote /scripts/whoowens —and soon after Tim had some fun and wrote his own script. So, when you run /script/whoowens on any of Reclaim’s servers you get the following:

That’s geeky and it’s awesome. Hosting humor #4life.

“Not Many People Gotta Code to Live By Anymore”

Amen, Harry Dean! All this talk of coding or being coded is besides the point, when push comes to shove most people simply need a code. I come back to Repo Man (1984) a lot when I am thinking about Reclaim Hosting‘s code. In fact, I already played on the idea of a Reclaim Code with the above clip. So when sitting down to talk to Bryan Mathers earlier this week about some artwork I was excited when I found the discussion led us into the territory of this 1980s punk cult classic.

Continue reading ““Not Many People Gotta Code to Live By Anymore””

Don’t Reclaim Meetings

I’m deeply skeptical of meetings. Ten years in higher ed will do this to you. I spent much of the last four years intentionally removing myself from the meeting culture that everywhere pervades. The thing that drove me craziest about meetings was the twisted logic that by simply being there you’re working. It was like Woody Allen’s quote “Showing up is 80 percent of life” immortalized through institutional cultures. Now my reaction may be a bit extreme, but that’s probably because in higher ed the extra bonus of meetings being conducted as pseudo-seminars is particularly painful. My approach is simpler: regularly share what you’re working on through your blog and we can meet in the comments. While I recognize that isn’t always feasible or even appropriate (and no one comments anymore), I can still dream, right?

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Reclaim Hosting’s first all-hands meeting

Anyway, today Reclaim Hosting had it’s first official all-hands meeting after two and a half years as a company. We held out pretty long, I’m proud of us. And as much as I kid on Twitter, this isn’t the beginning of the end. Rather, it is the beginning of the beginning. Joe McMahon called for the meeting given he thought it would be nice to convene regularly at some point during the week. And meetings are definitely better when you’re not forcing them down people’s throat. Hell, it was fun to catch up with everyone for an hour to learn tricks in CPanel, sharing about various projects, reminiscing about how awesome Fall has been, and project what’s to come. I could get used to it once a week, but I’ll just say now, for the record, we must be vigilant.

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Meeting creep is akin to The Blob‘s (1958) plotline. It starts out as an innocent kiss at Lover’s Lane and quickly ends up eating you alive…

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Ultimately resulting in an Air Force air-lift to the Arctic for who knows what’s next?

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You’ve been warned Reclaim, and this ain’t no juvenile delinquent scare tactic either, this comes from a hardened veteran whose very being is evidence of the deleterious effects of meeting culture in the workplace. AVENGE ME!

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