Omeka Case Studies

This week, Reclaim Hosting is running our second Workshop of One’s Own, where we will work with Domain of One’s Own admins to teach them about running DoOO on their campus. I’ve been tasked with talking through one of our most popular platforms, Omeka. While WordPress still takes the cake for the most popular applications run on our servers, Omeka has become increasingly popular. This post will dive into what Omeka is, and what you can do with the platform, and showcasing a few examples of how the platform could look when built out fully. You can read more about the other applications we are showcasing, Grav and Scalar. I’ve worked with Omeka for a little while but only when troubleshooting issues to specific sites, I haven’t built out a site like Omeka before. I took this a chance to look at the site in depth.

Omeka is a free open-source web-publishing platform. While it is open for anyone to use, the platform is mainly used by libraries, museums to archive items within their collections. The developers wanted to create a platform that allowed groups like this to create their own archive of collections just as easily as someone could start a blog. Omeka started with the development of Omeka classic, then the developers launched Omeka S, a standalone version similar to Omeka Classic. Omeka S has the option to streamline sites and more management features than Omeka Classic.  Omeka allows institutions like this to create online exhibits to archive any topic. It has a relatively simple user interface– once you get the hang of the layout, it’s fairly easy to use. You’ll do most of the site building through the dashboard: 

The main source code is standardized for each site but it is highly customizable based on themes and plugins used to build out the site. You can read more about installing themes and plugins on our Workshop of One’s Own website.

While I’m here, I’ll talk about three Omeka sites that are great examples of building out Omeka to archive events throughout history. The first is the Cork LGBT Archive. This website ‘aims to preserve, digitise, share and display information related to the history of the LGBT community in Cork, Ireland.’

This site showcases several exhibits of events within the LGBT community, building off of Arthur Leahy’s collection that began in the 1970s. One particular collection that stood out to me on this site was the Gay Sweatshop- Blood Green Collection. This archive a two-night play called ‘Blood Green’ that was put on by the Gay Sweatshop, at the Granery Theater. In an item within the collection, that describes what it was like to get the play up and running. 

Another great example of Omeka, is Making Modern America: Discovering the Great Depression and New Deal. This is was created during a class offered at the University of Oklahoma in the Fall of 2015. The course examined what happened during the Great Depression and the New Deal. Students created this instance of Omeka to curate what happened in Oklahoma during that time, and many chose to continue the project after the class finished. 

One thing that stood out to me is how the incorporated maps within their collection. This provides a great visual tool to document where things took place rather than documenting each item through exhibits. The class also added their lesson plans to the site through PDF embedding.

The last example I’ll talk about today is Georgetown University’s slavery archive.  This was created as an effort to document Georgetown University’s involvement in the institution of Slavery. But what’s unique about this specific project, is the blend of WordPress and Omeka. When you got to slavery.georgetown.edu, you’re brought to a WordPress site that shows what the project is and what they’re working on to document this portion of history.

But, the main archive uses Omeka. The slavery archive really goes into detail about how Georgetown and the surrounding area was involved with slavery. The collection itself is a repository of materials related to the Maryland Jesuits, Georgetown University, and Slavery in the surrounding areas. 


There are so many ways to use Omeka and to document pieces of history. These three sites are great examples of how you can document specific communities and periods of history around the world, specifically the LGBT community in Cork, Ireland, the New Deal in Oklahoma, and slavery at Georgetown University.

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Reclaiming Jekyll (Two Years Later)

Two years ago Tim wrote a great post detailing how you can get Jekyll up and running in shared hosting on Reclaim Hosting.* I’m late to this party, obviously, but playing with Grav recently led me back into Github thanks to the Github Sync plugin. I had explored Jekyll back in 2014 briefly (almost 4 years ago now, really?!), but I forgot most everything. I wanted to see if my Grav repository in Github (synced with my Grav install on Reclaim) would allow me to run the Grav files through Github pages (which is powered by Jekyll). Is this all crystal clear now? Good.

Turns out I was on a fool’s errand. Grav is a flat-file CMS, but it needs PHP to dynamically those pages as a site—which I should have understood. So it will not run on Github Pages.  Grav Sync is first and foremost for forking and collaborating on specific Grav instances (which I did understand), but I was trying to understand if those files could be seamlessly archived/translated into Jekyll given it was a repository, but I see my foolish ways now. Thank you, Tim 🙂 So while you can bring up individual pages from my Grav repository on Github, like the Welcome page:

But the site functionality of my Grav instance could not be reproduced. Lesson learned. But this did peak my interest in synching my locally installed Jekyll on Reclaim Hosting with my Jekyll on Github. So, I asked Tim and he suggested the following:

I’m not sure the exact steps but it would involve setting up the repo in Github and cloning it to your hosting account and > then you could use git commands like git pull to grab the latest from git (even setup a cron every 10-15 min to do that piece).

Turns out that was the exact approach—I wish I was that good. I took the Github repo I have at jimgroom.github.io (which maps to jimgroom.me) and clone it into the jekyll folder on my Reclaim Hosting account. I made sure to run jekyll build in the jimgroom.github.io folder so that it would build the site files in the _site directory. After that I pointed the DNS of the subdomain jekyll.murderinc.biz to the new directory, i.e. jekyll/jimgroom.github.io/_site and the same site at jimgroom.me on Github is cloned and also resolving through my shared hosting account at jekyll.murderinc.biz. The two things needed to sync changes made on Github is running the following commands in the jekyll/jimgroom.github.io folder on my shared hosting (making sure you are logged into command line through your virtual Ruby environment):

git pull

and then

jekyll build

Pull in any changes and then rebuilds the site so those changes are published to _site. None of this is new by any means, I am just playing catch up. Adam Croom went down this road two years ago in order to stick a fork in the LMS using Github, and I can say from firsthand experience that wrapping your head around Github can be intense, but that’s no excuse for an ed-tech to give up:

“An Ed-Tech spends her life getting into tense situations!”
-A Github Repo Man

*This setup requires CloudLinux, which we have installed on all our shared hosting servers. 

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Serving Up Some Yo La Tengo

This has been quite a semester for shared hosting servers. We spun up D.O.A., Sebadoh, and Wire in January alone, but the hits just keep on coming at Reclaim Hosting. While I was back in Fredericksburg two weeks ago I was binge listening to Yo La Tengo. I could not get enough, and given they’ve been making music since the mid 80s there was plenty to choose from. When we decided we needed a fourth shared hosting server this semester*—there was no question this one would be dedicated to the indie-rock royalty from Hoboken, New Jersey.

Yo La Tengo

My introduction to Yo La Tengo started fairly late with their 1995 album Electr-O-Pura and then their 1997 masterpiece I Can Hear the Heart Beating as One. The latter is one of my favorite albums of all-time, and songs like “Sugar Cube,” “Autumn Sweater,” and “Little Honda” (a Beach Boys cover) offer a brilliant insight to this bands metaphorical agility, emo inclinations, and exhilarating joyrides that characterize so much of their music.  

I also love their long, hypnotic instrumentals like “Heard You Looking” off their 1993 album Painful, or “Blue Line Swinger” off Electr-O-Pura:

Or their love ballad “You Can Have it All” (another cover) off And Then Nothing Turned Itself Inside-Out.

I could go on like this for a while. But I’m sure you get the point. And unlike most of the bands we name servers after, Yo La Tengo is still going strong after 30 years as a band, with an album due out in March and a tour that will bring them to Italy in May. So with that, I leave you with another ear worm from their album Fade, “Ohm:”

It’s hard not to respect the range, lasting power, and sense of joy this band brings to their work, and that might be one of the reasons they’re quickly becoming an all-time favorite.

*The fact we retired the Minutemen, Hüsker Dü, and Butthole Surfers servers last month and migrated all existing accounts to Wire, D.O.A., and Sebadoh respectively drove a significant amount of the server setup mania the last two months.

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Reclaiming WordPress Multisite

Lauren Brumfield already announced that we’re officially rolling out WordPress Multisite (WPMS) hosting at Reclaim. What’s more, she created an online calculator that provides transparent pricing going forward, which is a big part of why we’re finally announcing something we have done for years. While we’ve been pretty laser-focused on shared hosting and Domain of One’s Own for the last four years, we’ve still picked up more than a few WPMS instances. In fact, we jumped in at the deep-end of the pool when we started hosting the colossus that is VCU’s Rampages. As a result Tim was able to really fine-tune high demand WPMS environments like Rampages, and we’re in a situation where we can comfortably manage just about anything out there in higher ed.

It’s fun for me because I cut my teeth on WordPress Multiuser (even before it was multisite), and when Tim came onboard at UMW the first thing we asked him was how he felt about managing UMW Blogs. The rest is Reclaim history, he proved an insanely quick study and went from UMW Blogs to Hippie Hosting to Domain of One’s Own to Reclaim Hosting in two short years. That’s a resume!

back to the future, we really weren’t comfortable with announcing WPMS at Reclaim too early because we were experimenting with different setups across various data centers like AWS, Linode, and Digital Ocean, so things were always custom based on several factors which meant the pricing varied. But when Digital Ocean recently announced their new plans and pricing model, we were sure we had a solid setup through Digital Ocean that would allow us to stabilize our WPMS offerings as well as making them extremely competitive when it comes to pricing.

Before we could announce anything we had to reach out to all existing customers we and let them know of the new setup, for many of them this meant a significant savings. Once took care of that, we figured it was high time to officially announce that we are in the WPMS hosting business. So if you have a WPMS site you want to offload to external hosting, let’s talk. Pricing is simple: server, backups, and software licensing (Bitninja, cPanel, etc) at cost, whereas our monthly maintenance and management fees starts at $250 per month. This model finally allows us to decouple server and software costs from management demands, and establishes a baseline for what our time is worth to ensure you get the service we’re known for. It also makes clear that what you pay us for is not the hardware or software, but the peace of mind that tried and true experts are on the job. I mean let’s be honest here, this isn’t some hack outfit working from a ramshackle UMW office in duPont Hall trying to duct tape together some kind of chitty-chitty-bang-bang syndication solution, we’re professionals—and for that you must pay!

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Using Flickr to embed images

They say a picture is worth a thousand words. It can help illustrate a point you’re trying to make, how you felt at a particular moment or provide something to look at while you’re giving a presentation. I mainly use images to break up the writing on my posts. Using images means that I’m taking up space on the server to use them on my blog. That space can fill up quickly when you have a limited amount of space on a server too.

But there is a way around this! You can use Flickr to easily embed your own images on your site without taking up a ton of space on my account. Flickr is a ‘freemium’ web service where you can upload up to 1TB of images for free. You can organize the photos into albums and even edit the photos.

I stumbled across this solution when I was quickly reaching my storage quota for my website during ds106. I needed a way to upload all the images I created and didn’t have enough room on my website. So I thought I would show you all how simple it is to embed the images in posts and pages.

Uploading Images:

Before you can put the images on your website, you’ll need to upload them to Flickr. From the Flickr homepage, click the cloud icon in the top right corner.

You can click ‘Choose Photos and Videos to Upload’ or click and drag the images directly onto the screen to upload the images.

Once the images render, you can change the name, add them to albums, and give the item’s tags to organize them. This is totally your preference. When you’re ready, click ‘Upload’ in the top right corner. You’ll confirm the upload as well.

Embedding the Images

Once you have the images on Flickr. Click the photo you’d like to put on your website. Then click the down arrow icon. Click ‘View all sizes.’

This will bring up a new screen where you can toggle between image sizes. Select the image size you’d like to embed, then right click and click ‘Copy Image Address.’

This will give us a direct link to the image, rather than the Flickr album/photostream. Navigate to the WordPress post/page you’re working on. Within the visual editor, paste the link to the image.

Flickr will automatically change the URL into an image. You can manipulate it like you would if it was uploaded directly to the site.


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Back in the Burg

I’ve been back in the Burg for the last 10 days working from Reclaim’s HQ on a range of stuff. As a result the bava has been a bit quiet given the push to get as much done as possible in a relatively short time frame. I’ve been able to get some of my stuff out of storage on the first day of my return, which has been on focus of the trip. I’ve been going through boxes of toys, books, movies, and more which is always a fun past time for me. I’m figuring out how to get my stuff overseas in the next month os so, but until then I am using CoWork’s unclaimed spaces as a temporary waylay station. 

This rip-up brought to you by Civic TV

Paint it Black

We have also been working quite diligently on making Reclaim Video a reality, which has been quite a blast. I’ll post more on that soon, but we did a pretty intense carpet and tile rip as well as began painting the store, which Lauren blogged about earlier today. Watching the space come together has been a dream come true—I’ve pretty much wanted to run a VHS store since I was a pre-teen, so this is pretty exciting.

Pioneer DVL-700

I have also been doing some shopping for VHS tapes, laserdiscs, game consoles, and more. I went to Fat Kat Records 20 minutes south of here in Ladysmith and picked up a ton of mint laserdiscs as well as a mint Pioneer DVL700. I even tested it out with a showing of Red Dawn …. WOLVERINES!

Red Dawn Title

When the Mongols could see each other they had worked themselves up into a pretty good frenzy.

I’ve also been a regular at the Library of Congress’s Packard Campus in Culpepper, VA, which has been amazing. I got to see Sense and Sensibility, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, The Last Picture Show, and Lawrence of Arabia , all of them in glorious 35mm. I even missed a few gems like Guess Who’s coming to Dinner, A River Runs Through It, and The Adventures of Baron Munchausen—world enough and time!

Packard Campus February Program

But that’s alright, there’s always March!

Packard Campus March Schedule

I was a little sad to learn that Culpepper’s 1938 State Theater had closed after only being re-opened for two years. There was a major funding drive to get investors help refurbish and re-open Culpepper’s movie house at the tune of $13 million dollars, It was an impressive remodeling to restore it to its original glory. I had the good fortune to see Independence Day there in 2014. But that was then, since it has gone defunct and just a few weeks ago it was auctioned to the highest bidder for $700,000.

I was also able to rekindle my ds106 roots with a quick stop by UMW yesterday to record a  video for The End 106 with the great Martha Burtis. She’s a genius.

 And later that afternoon I actually got back in the classroom after a long hiatus to talk to to an awesome group of students in Eddie Maloney’s graduate course Technology Innovation by Design, which is part of Georgetown’s new Masters program in Learning and Design. It was a thrill to talk to student who want to think critically about the future of educational design, and I’ll write more about my approach in a follow-up post. I do miss the classroom, it is always a lot of fun for me—but damn I tend to talk a lot.

Anyway, if nothing else, this post serves as a roadmap for all the posts I need to write after taking a bit of a hiatus from the blog in order to dig in a bit while here in the US. it’s been quite nice to work alongside Meredith, Lauren, and Tim in CoWork—it’s been a welcome change to reconnect in person with the awesome crew that makes Reclaim so damn good.

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1 Year with Reclaim

January 30th, 2017, the day that I started as an intern at Reclaim Hosting. Which, at the time of writing this, it was 1 year ago to the day. How crazy is that? A year ago I was a second-semester senior, itching to get out in the real world and be done with school. I was so ready to finish my degree and start working. I don’t remember too much about the day, just that I was super nervous because I had no clue where to start in the world of web hosting. I think the day really consisted of paperwork. Thinking back to where I am today, I’ve learned a ton. Not just in the web hosting community, but about myself as well. So this post is just a bit of reflection in the year that I’ve worked with Reclaim, first as an intern, then part-time, and finally full-time this fall. I wrote about my time as an intern on this blog and what I’ve been up to while full time  (over here).
Keep notes: Yes, note taking does not stop after high school/college. It may not be as intense as a 50-minute lecture where the professor talks the entire class, but it’s still super useful. There are so many ways to take notes. Lauren uses her blog as a place for notes on specific processes. I personally have to write them down to stay in my brain, so I keep a little notebook in my bag and jot notes as I got. But, I’m slowly but surely heading towards the blog. Ask questions: I can’t say it enough, ask questions. Then ask some more. And don’t worry if you think you’re being annoying with all the questions, but that’s really the way to learn. Clarity: Explaining thing clearly is key. I’m still trying to get the hang of this, but I’ve found writing more detailed responses helps a ton when you are trying to troubleshoot. I still have a ton to learn, which is a great thing. I would be worried I did. I definitely want to keep learning, and I can absolutely do that through this job.
Ok now for the fun stuff! What has the year held for Meredith at Reclaim? Well let me tell ya, it was a fun year. I got to travel, first to Oklahoma in June, then to NYC in November. Both of these trips were incredible. The Oklahoma trip was to Reclaim’s first ever Domains conference in Oklahoma City.  This was a tremendous experience for one because I got to attend a conference that my company was running, but I got to see the schools and universities we work with through Domain of One’s Own. The NYC trip was a perfect opportunity for the Reclaim team to get some team bonding in. I started working full time a couple of months before and it was the perfect time to regroup before the end of the year. If you’d like to read more about these trips, I wrote blog posts about each (linked above). I got to see our office space, CoWork, expand to the what it is today. When I came in it looked like this:
Lauren Brumfield’s photo
And this is what it looks like now:
Talk about a space transformation! While I wasn’t completely around for the entire transformation, it was still super cool to see the midpoint of the renovations to the completed space. That second CoWork photo brings me to my last big moment of the year. In late October, we ran a workshop covering the ins and outs of Domain of One’s Own. This workshop is catered towards the Domain of One’s Own admins and how they can support the program on their campus. I had the privilege of talking through Domain migrations and transfers during the second day. Speaking to a group like this was something I’d never done before. It was a great opportunity to step out of my comfort zone.
And speaking of comfort zones, 2018 is shaping up to be a big one. In April, Reclaim is heading across the pond to Bristol, England for a two-day conference. During that conference, I’ll be speaking. Yes, I’m speaking at a conference. That’s something I never thought I’d hear see my self say type.  But in all honesty, I’m super excited for this opportunity and nervous at the same time (but it all goes away when I think about the fact I’m going back to England). But who knows where the rest of 2018 will bring! I’m honestly so glad I found this internship with Reclaim that led to a full time position. The opportunities Jim and Tim have given me are incredible, and I’m so grateful. Here’s to a year full of lessons and growth! Featured Image by Roman Bozhko on Unsplash
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Stay Glued to Your Reclaim Hosting

We setup our second shared hosting server in Europe last week in Digital Ocean’s London-based data center. Originally it was in response to the poor performance we were having with our Kraftwerk server in Frankfurt. As fate would have it, Kraftwerk is running better than ever since we set this new server up, but we are still ready and willing to take any request to be moved off Kraftwerk onto, wait for it …. the Wire server.
Our own correspondent is sorry to tell Of an uneasy time that all is not well On the borders there’s movement In the hills there is trouble From “Reuters”
Named after London’s punk pioneers that were eluded by mainstream success of bands like The Clash, Sex Pistols, and The Ramones, but had arguably as great an influence on everything from hardcore to post-punk to alternative music of the 80s, 90s and beyond. Their debut album Pink Flag has become a classic, and to steal a quote from the Wikipedia article:
Steve Huey of AllMusic opined that Pink Flag was “perhaps the most original debut album to come out of the first wave of British punk”
That’s something. It’s worth listening to all 22 songs, the shape and form of the album displays obvious influence on The Minutemen‘s Double Nickels on the Dime. It defies an simple definition of punk, hence its wide influence, and in many ways captures the spirit of musical exploration around the idea of punk before that word morphs into a genre-defining set of characteristics that come to dictate the form in the 1980s. My first exposure to Wire was through Minor Threat’s cover of their song “12XU:” I remember listening to them based on the cover and thinking they’re not punk. That might provide a small, solipsistic sense of how alien they could seem only 8 or 9 years after releasing their debut album. But listening to them 30 years later they’re fresher than ever. So, in honor of timeless British punk, Europe’ second shared hosting server, and the UK’s first,* is named in their honor. Special thanks to Anne-Marie Scott who was willing to help us make sure this one worked by allowing us to migrate her sites before the announcement, and we can confirm no blog posts were lost during the transfer 🙂
*Might be worth noting this is not our first server in Digital Ocean’s London data center, we also host Coventry University’s instance of Domain of One’s Own through this data center, but given that is not a shared hosting server it is fair to say Wire is the UK’s first shared hosting server.
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Digital Ocean’s One-Click Apps vs. Cloudron

Digital Ocean has been en fuego as of late. They announced a whole bunch of new droplet plans, and the price-point for all of them has gone down. This is very good news for Reclaim Hosting because it gives us some breathing room with our infrastructure costs allowing us to continue to keep costs low.  We have been slowly moving most of our infrastructure from Linode and ReliableSite to Digital Ocean, and we could not be happier. They are constantly improving their offerings, and being in a virtual environment where we can increase storage or scale CPU instantaneously makes our life (and our clients’) a lot easier.
One-click Apps at Digital Ocean

One-click Apps at Digital Ocean

In addition to new plans and pricing, I noticed they were featuring one-click apps as well (though not sure how new this is), and I took a peak to see what they offered. It was interesting to see that some of the application they featured, namely Discourse (the forum software) and Ghost (the blogging app), were apps Reclaim was offering beyond our shared hosting cPanel-based LAMP stack. Given we’ve been exploring a one-click option with Cloudron (I recently blogged about setting up Ghost using Cloudron) I wanted to compare Digital Ocean’s idea of one-click to Cloudron’s. Long story short, there is no comparison. Here is Digital Ocean’s command line interface for setting up Ghost:

Command line interface during Ghost setup on Digital Ocean’s one-click apps

Here is Cloudron’s:

One-click install of Ghost on Cloudron

Digital Ocean is amazing at what they do, but their idea of one-click installs still assumes a sysadmin level of knowledge, which, to be fair, make sense given they are a service designed for sysadmins. When I tried the Ghost app it was, indeed, installed on a droplet in seconds, but the actual configuration to setup required full-blown tutorial for command line editing the setup. In addition to the domain pointing, this was setting up SSL and Nginx, granted that simply meant typing “yes” or “no” and clicking enter, but even when you did the setup was not guaranteed. After following the tutorial to the letter I still got the Nginx 502 bad gateway error, which means I was stuck.

Ghost 502 Bad Gateway Nginx Error

I could have tried to troubleshoot the 502 error, but at this point it was just a test and from my experience it was far from one-click.

Discourse example

I then tried the Discourse, and this was definitely easier than Ghost. It still required a tutorial, but that was primarily focused on setting up an SMTP account through Mailgun so the application could send email. After that, the setup was simple, but again the one-click setup process on Digital Ocean assumes an understanding of API-driven transactional email services like Mailgun or Sparkpost. Cloudron does not have a Discourse installer, so no real comparison there, but if it could manage the SMTP email setup in the background, I imagine it would be just as simple as their Ghost installer. I’m glad I explored Digital Ocean’s one-click application offerings because it confirms for me the potential power of tools like Cloudron that truly make it simple to install applications. Our community by and large will not be folks with sysadmin level knowledge, so integrating a solution that is truly one-click, avoiding DNS and command line editing,  would be essential.
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Hardcore Show Flyers

The other day at Reclaim Hosting we were having some issues with the Devo server. Load was high and while investigating it I happened to see traffic to the domain hardcoreshowflyers.net through Apache status. I was intrigued, so rather than fixing the server I headed over to the site (I jest, Tim fixed the server—per usual 🙂 ) to see if it was what I thought it was, and boy was it ever.
Crumbsuckers' "Life of Dreams" album advertisement

Crumbsuckers’ “Life of Dreams” album advertisement

The site was a full blown archive of hardcore punk show flyers from the 1970s through 2017. After this chance discovery I proceeded to lose a good part of the day. One of my earliest music shows was a Sunday matinee at CBGBs in 1985 to see the our hometown punk band The Crumbsuckers. It just so happens that they were playing with New York City hardcore legends The Cro-Mags—I was pretty blown away. I am not certain, but this flyer could very well be an advertisement for that show I went to in 1985: How this fuels my penchant for nostalgia. But the craziest part is looking through the flyers to see what shows I was at. Crumbsuckers were my entré to the scene, and I quickly learned to love the Cro-Mags, Murphy’s Law, and Agnostic Front (a kind of trio of NYC trashcore), but the Bad Brians were something else all together for me. It led me to the DC scene and the straight-edge movement defined by Minor Threat, which then led me to Dag Nasty. At the same time the straightedge scene was gaining steam led by Youth of Today, Judge, Uniform Choice, and Bold. I went to more than a few Youth of Today shows, and after a while it began to get fairly boring and preachy with Ray of Today talking shit on “the dope smoking longhairs” —and then a whole bunch of bands (including the Cro-Mags) became Hari Krishnas and I was outta there.

Bold, Supertouch, and Sick of it All flyer for a show at The Anthrax in 1987

I know I saw Youth of Today and Uniform Choice at CBGBs, and I believe a show with Bold and Judge (though not sure if they played together) at The Anthrax in Norwalk, Connecticut in 1986 or 1987. But the site also reminded me of bands I have seen but not thought about in a long while like Supertouch, No for an Answer, Sick of it All, and many others. There were a ton of bands associated with the scene, and it’s amazing how these simple flyers capture not only my imagination, but chronicle the various sinews of a entire subculture. This is very cool work, and once I fell down the rabbit hole I noticed the site was looking for patrons. I could not resist, for me the folks who have the time and patience to collect and curate an archive like this provide an indispensable service that takes a ton of effort. What’s more, it directly feeds into my personal interests and history. I immediately benefitted from it, so it only made good sense to support he work. But cooler than that is it was using Reclaim Hosting so we could waive hosting fees to try and ensure a site like this stays online as long as possible. Hardcore Show Flyers represents the best of the web for me, a niche collection someone has amassed and wants to share freely over time. This is obviously a passion for the proprietor, and the small, passion-driven web wins for me every time. Thanks for this.