Using the Import/Export Tools in WordPress

Lately, I’ve been working with clients to move their website from WordPress.com to WordPress.org. With this request, I use the Import/Export tools to move the content from one site to the other. This tool bundles the content on the site into a .zip file which you can then move to another location. Disclaimer: It isn’t perfect, you only get the content of the site, so things like posts, pages, and settings on the site. The plugins, themes, and media arent’ included, so, if your site has a lot of media, or has a ton of plugins, this tool might not work for you. (I’m writing another post about a plugin that will move everything on the site for you so stay tuned).

As I’m writing to the clients with instructions on how to set up their site using these tools, I started looking for a tutorial that would walk them through the process. And can you believe it, there are no tutorials that show the process from start to finish? So I wanted to take the time to write the process down. This article will showcase the import/export tools within WordPress (.com and .org) the process is essentially the same for both, they just look a little different.

But wait, there are two versions of WordPress? Yes, there are, but they are run in different ways.  WordPress, in a nutshell, is an open-source content management software (if you want to look at a more in-depth explanation you can read about it here).  Automattic Inc. helps develop and maintain this software. We offer this software at Reclaim and users can install an instance on their domain, in fact, you’re reading this post on a WordPress installation.

WordPress.com is Automattic Inc.’s hosting company that runs the WordPress software explicitly. They offer free accounts with subdomains like meredithfierro.wordpress.com for free or users can purchase a domain. Then users can opt-in to pay a monthly fee to get full use of the software, like you would if you installed WordPress on your domain through your hosting company.


WordPress.com

Export:

The first thing you’ll want to do is export all of the content. Also, take note of the plugins and theme the site is using (this will save time on the other side).

  1.  Click ‘Settings’ under ‘Configure’ 
  2. Click ‘Export,’ under the ‘Site Tools’ section:
  3. From here you can choose the amount of content you’d like to export, or you can export the entire content on the website. When you’ve decided what to export, click ‘Export’: 
  4. WordPress begins to package the content together. When it finishes, a banner should appear at the top of the screen. Click ‘Download’: 

Read more

Directories for Domains: a Community Approach

Many of us in a certain subgenre of edtech have been working for a long time to try and use RSS to syndicate and aggregate posts from individual blogs into community sites. These sites are sometimes referred to as planet sites, mother blogs, aggregator sites, syndication hubs, etc. A good example of this is ds106, where posts are not only syndicated into the Blog Flow, but also the assignment bank—making for a richer, more targeted contextualization of student posts. Over the last seven years ds106 has syndicated more the 75,000 posts, providing a point of creative contact—if you will.

The syndication and aggregation for ds106 is all handled by FeedWordPress, which can grab the RSS feed of just about any publishing platform that exposes one. In order to simplify things, we’re using a Gravity Form to help automate the sign-up process. It’s far from a perfect setup, but it has been working fairly well for almost seven years now. In fact, it has been a template for other site aggregators, including the first Community directory site that Martha Burtis and Tim Owens built around UMW Domains in 2014 (which is no longer in use).   Read more

Installing and Customizing a Scalable WordPress Multisite with Linode’s StackScripts

I’ve been on a server admin crash course over the last 8 months or so, and I’ve been thoroughly enjoying myself. I have been fortunate to have the most patient and generous teacher I’ve ever studied under: the great Tim Owens. I truly have a deep respect for how much he has taught himself over the last 4 years, and trying to catch up with him gives me an even deeper appreciation of his mad skills. One of the turning points for Reclaim Hosting this semester has been taking on large-scale WordPress Multisite instances for institutions. We jumped in with both feet when we took over the hosting of VCU’s Ram Pages—a beast I have written about recently. Tim did a brilliant job scaling this extremely resource intensive WordPress Multisite, and I was eager to try my hand at the setup. Luckily Reclaim has no shortage of opportunities, and recently the University of North Carolina, Asheville was interested in experimenting with a pilot of WordPress Multisite, so I got my chance to work through the setup with a brand new install. Read more

Hosting VCU’s Ram Pages

Reclaim Hosting has been hosting VCU’s Ram Pages as of the beginning of the Spring semester. It reinforces for me there is nothing Tim Owens can’t do, another yet another example of the powerful ripple effects of #ds106 on edtech. We’ve been loath to proclaim victory too soon given what a beast Ram Pages is. And I thought we had a blogging revolution at UMW! In two short years Ram Pages has been home to over 16,000 blogs for 15,500 users. That’s nothing short of mind boggling. Tom Woodward—in his quiet, self-defacing way—has built and managed a blog empire at VCU’s ALT Lab, and over the last 6-8 months Tim and I have been trying to figure out how the hell we would migrate it cleanly given it can grow at intervals of 1000 users any given week.

Hosting VCU’s Ram Pages

We (royal for Tim) moved it over Christmas vacation on to a beefy Linode instance running Ubuntu, Varnish, and Nginx after sharding the database to 256. Yesterday we finally got the second backup solution working, which in addition to nightly snapshots we now have file-level, off-site backups through R1Soft Licenses (more on that in another post). This may be one of the largest, most active academic blogging systems in higher ed, and it is a real source of pride that we’re hosting it. And I saying this knowing full-well it is a total jinx [crosses fingers]….it’s been rock solid so far. Don’t ever question the power of Reclaiming!

Reclaim Hosting I figured I'd write up some thoughts on how I approach the problem of cleaning up a site that's been hacked. Not all WordPress hacks

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